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fuchsia rust

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  • Chemicals: using them in gardens

    Chemicals: using them in gardens

    Non-chemical means of control are always the first choice for gardeners. But when other means fail, pesticides may be appropriate in tackling some pests, diseases and weed problems.

  • Acid cherry. Image: RHS

    Cherries: acid

    Acid cherries tolerate some shade, so are a good choice for a north-facing site or wall. They are self-fertile and do not need another tree to act as a pollinator. The fruits are too acid to eat raw, but are excellent when cooked and make very good jam.

  • Sweet cherry. Image: RHS

    Cherries: sweet

    Sweet cherries are usually grown as small open trees or trained as fans against walls or fences. They are too vigorous to be trained as espaliers or cordons. They can be grown in large containers, and self-fertile cultivars will fruit without a pollination partner.

  • Cherry blackfly (Myzus cerasi) on Cherry (Prunus sp.). Credit: RHS/Entomology.

    Cherry blackfly

    Cherry blackfly can cause distorted foliage on cherries, this is unsightly but does not stop cherry trees from flowering or bearing fruit.

  • cherry run off

    Cherry fruit drop

    In some seasons, sweet cherries loose much of their fruit before it ripens. This loss is called cherry fruit drop or run off and, in severe cases, it can lead to an almost total failure of the crop.

  • cherry leaf scorch

    Cherry leaf scorch and leaf spot

    Both ornamental and edible cherry trees can suffer from the foliar diseases known as leaf scorch and leaf spot. These lead to unsightly yellow or brown leaves.

  • Chestnut blight. Credit: Forestry Commission Picture Library

    Chestnut blight

    Chestnut blight was confirmed on European sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa) for the first time in the UK in 2011. Recent findings (2016) in Devon, Dorset and Kent highlight the continued threat posed by the pathogen. In the UK, the fungus is a notifiable pathogen and suspected cases of the disease must be reported to the relevant plant health authority.

  • © RHS WSYD0012466

    Chickweed

    Chickweed (Stellaria media) is a familiar sight in many gardens. With large quantities of seed produced throughout the year, this common annual weed can become a real nuisance in beds and borders.

  • Pieris lime induced chlorosis

    Chlorosis

    Chlorosis, or yellowing, of the leaves of plants can have many different causes. In some cases it is a harmless part of the natural growth cycle of the plant, but it can also be indicative of adverse factors such as nutrient deficiencies, pests, diseases or cultural problems.

  • Mines on chrysanthemum leaves

    Chrysanthemum leaf miner

    Chrysanthemum leaf miner larvae make tunnels in the foliage of chrysanthemum and many other plants in the Asteraceae (daisy) family.

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