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Herbaceous Perennial

Primula 'Primlet Purple' (Primlet Series) (Pr/Prim)

A semi-evergreen, rosette-forming perennial with dark green leaves. Produces purple double flowers in spring, which are rosebud shaped on opening.

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Size
Ultimate height
Up to 10cm
Time to ultimate height
1–2 years
Ultimate spread
0–0.1 metre
Growing conditions
Clay
Loam
Moisture
Moist but well–drained
pH
Neutral, Acid
Colour & scent
StemFlowerFoliageFruit
Spring Purple Green
Summer Green
Autumn Green
Winter Purple Green
Position
  • Full sun
  • Partial shade
Aspect

East–facing or South–facing or West–facing

Exposure
Exposed or Sheltered
Hardiness
H3
Botanical details
Family
Primulaceae
Native to the UK
No
Foliage
Semi evergreen
Habit
Clump forming
Genus

Primula are herbaceous or semi-evergreen perennials, forming a basal rosette of simple leaves, with salver-shaped or bell-shaped flowers which may be solitary or carried in an umbel or in whorls on an erect stem

Name status

Unresolved

Horticultural Group
Primrose group primulas are mainly grown as herbaceous perennials, and produce clusters of flowers on individual stems from the basal rosettes, although a few may also have umbel-like flowers. They are either spring-flowering, if grown without protection, or winter- to spring-flowering, if grown as biennial container plants in greenhouses or indoors.

How to grow

Cultivation

Grow in deep, humus-rich, moist soil. Partial shade is ideal, but will tolerate full sun if the soil is kept moist

Propagation

Propagate by seed sown in spring, or by division between autumn and early spring. Root basal cuttings or offsets in autumn or early spring

Suggested planting locations and garden types
  • City and courtyard gardens
  • Cottage and informal garden
  • Houseplants
  • Patio and container plants
  • Banks and slopes
  • Bedding
  • Conservatory and greenhouse
  • Flower borders and beds
  • Garden edging
  • Underplanting of roses and shrubs
Pruning

Deadhead after flowering

Pests

May be susceptible to aphids, glasshouse red spider mite, glasshouse leafhopper and vine weevil. Slugs and snails may cause damage to leaves

Diseases

May be susceptible to virus diseases, grey moulds and primula brown core

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