• AGM plants

    AGM plants have been through a rigorous trial and assessment programme. They are:

    • Excellent for ordinary use in appropriate conditions
    • Available to buy
    • Of good constitution
    • Essentially stable in form & colour
    • Reasonably resistant to pests & diseases

World’s first 100% blight resistant tomato: from Suttons Seeds

Suttons introduce what is claimed to be the first completely blight-resistant tomato

'Crimson Crush' is the first 100%25 blight resistant tomatoWith tomatoes around the country ruined by blight in recent years, the arrival of the completely blight resistant tomato will save veg growers everywhere from a fruitless season.

'Crimson Crush' is a standard indeterminate tomato developed to be grown outside in the veg garden, allotment or container. The vivid red fruits are large - they weigh in at up to about 7oz/200g each, and are carried in generous trusses.

Its exceptional disease resistance is the result of the fact that this is the first variety to have two different resistance genes instead of just one. Just to be technical for a moment: it has the PH2 and PH3 genes which make it resistant to all common British blight strains including what are known as “Pink 6” and “Blue 13”, the strains which have decimated outdoor tomato crops in recent years.

But - the crucial question - what about the taste? Suttons Seeds, who are introducing 'Crimson Crush', told me: “The taste is outstanding, far superior to any other disease resistant variety. A very rich tomatoey (if that's even a word) flavour; taste is very subjective but this tastes like a tomato should. It's a variety that was selected for its excellent flavour before we were even aware of its blight resistance.”

Blight resistant tomato 'Crimson Crush' has a genuine full tomato flavour'Crimson Crush' was developed as collaboration between legendary British tomato breeder Simon Crawford, who developed 'Red Alert', the first bush tomato worth growing, and a PhD student at Bangor University. It was first spotted in a glasshouse in Yorkshire but then in a trials field in North Wales it stood out as a shining green and red beacon surrounded by blight infested tomato plants.

You can order plants of 'Crimson Crush' tomato from Suttons Seeds.

** Please note the contents of this blog reflect the views of its author and are not necessarily those of the RHS **

Discuss this

for the site or to share your experiences on this topic and seek advice from our community of gardeners.

  • Dave the Tiler

    By Dave the Tiler on 30/04/2015

    "decimated outdoor tomato crops in recent years"? Do you mean "wiped-out outdoor tomato crops in recent years? Decimated means cut into ten pieces


    This comment has been reported and is currently under moderation.

    0 replies

  • Dave the Tiler

    By Dave the Tiler on 30/04/2015

    or reduce by a tenth - I was going to say, but posted too soon!


    This comment has been reported and is currently under moderation.

    0 replies

  • ChristyRose

    By ChristyRose on 26/09/2015

    I bought 3 crimson crush plants back in the spring. All of them have blight. What has gone wrong? Why have the got blight when they are supposed to be resistant to it?


    0 replies

    Report
  • EamonnT

    By EamonnT on 27/09/2015

    Hi I have grown Crimson Crush this year and it does taste fantastic with a characteristic pinky colour in the centre of the fruit. It is however showing the characteristic brown line up the stem which is characteristic of Phytophthora infestans. I grew it in an area that consistently gets the fungus along with some Roma tomatoes ( Blight fodder ) that are now in the advanced stages of the disease. I have previously grown 'Ferline' F1 Hybrid on the same bit of ground only to see none of the tomatoes make it to red


    0 replies

    Report
  • Mr G Rice

    By Mr G Rice on 02/10/2015

    Following the comments from EamonnT and ChristyRose I asked Tom Sharples, the veteran seeds expert at Suttons Seeds, the only seed company to sell ‘Crimson Crush’, for his comment. “We have received only 17 complaints out of 39,000 sales,” Tom told me. “ We have followed them all up and it turned out that six related to ‘Marmande’ or another beefsteak type – not ‘Crimson Crush’. Customers had destroyed some of the others so in those cases it’s impossible to assess the situation. We have sent plant material from a couple of plants sent in by customers for analysis at an independent lab and are waiting for the results.” He then reminded me of an important point. “We do of course say in the catalogue and on the website that signs of 10-15% infection may be seen before the plant grows through it and crops normally.” So some plants may show some signs of blight, but they can tolerate this and still give a good crop.


    0 replies

    Report
  • anonymous

    By anonymous on 12/12/2015

    I`m in the USA,Looking for someone to send me Crimson Crush Tomato Seeds,I will pay for your shipping and send you back many tomato seeds of my own.Randall Bell 2320 Richards Lane Springfield Illinois 62702 USA,,,THANK-YOU


    0 replies

    Report

Get involved

We're a UK charity established to share the best in gardening. We want to enrich everyone's life through plants, and make the UK a greener and more beautiful place.