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Annual Biennial

Zea mays 'Lark'
  • RHS AGM

sweet corn 'Lark'

An extra tender ‘tendersweet’ variety with sweet, soft, delicious cobs. It’s an early to mid-season variety, produces good yields and has good cold soil performance with more reliable germination than most of the supersweet varieties. Sow indoors: April to May. Sow / plant outside: May to June. Harvest: August to September

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Size
Ultimate height
1.5–2.5 metres
Time to ultimate height
1 year
Ultimate spread
0.5–1 metres
Growing conditions
Chalk
Clay
Loam
Sand
Moisture
Moist but well–drained
pH
Acid, Neutral, Alkaline
Colour & scent
StemFlowerFoliageFruit
Spring Green
Summer Green
Autumn
Winter
Position
  • Full sun
Aspect

East–facing or South–facing or West–facing

Exposure
Sheltered
Hardiness
H2
Botanical details
Family
Poaceae
Native to the UK
No
Foliage
Deciduous
Habit
Columnar upright
Genus

A genus of five, large, flowering plants the grass family. The most important species, Zea mays is widely cultivated food crop. Male flowers are borne in large, terminal inflorescences (tassels) and female flowers are hidden in clusters in the leaf axils

Name status

Accepted

How to grow

Cultivation

Grow in a sunny, sheltered spot in soil that has been enriched with well-rotted organic matter. Sweetcorn can tolerate many soil types but prefers well-drained soils with a pH between 5.5 and 7.0. Harvest from August to September. See sweetcorn cultivation for futher information.

Propagation

Sow seeds undercover fromApril to May in pots or modules and then plant out May - June after hardening off and the last frosts have passed. Alternatively sow 'in situ' from late spring to early summer. Always plant in a grid pattern to ensure pollination. See sowing vegetable seeds

Suggested planting locations and garden types
Pruning

No pruning required.

Pests

May be susceptible to damage from birds, slugs, mice and badgers.

Diseases

May be susceptible to smuts which appear as large galls on the cobs and stalks in hot weather.

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