Not the plant you're looking for? Search over 300,000 plants
Annual Biennial

Daucus carota 'Ideal Red'
  • RHS AGM
  • RHS Plants for pollinators

carrot 'Ideal Red'

This variety is ideal for beginners and children to grow as it is fast maturing, tastes deliciously sweet when harvested as ‘baby’ carrots, and produces rich-orange uniform roots. A 'Nantes' type variety it is great for growing in containers and where space is limited. Sow March until July, harvest June until October.

Size
Ultimate height
0.1–0.5 metres
Time to ultimate height
1 year
Ultimate spread
0.1–0.5 metres
Growing conditions
Clay
Loam
Sand
Moisture
Moist but well–drained, Well–drained
pH
Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Colour & scent
StemFlowerFoliageFruit
Spring Green
Summer Green
Autumn Green
Winter
Position
  • Full sun
Aspect

South–facing or West–facing

Exposure
Sheltered
Hardiness
H4
Botanical details
Family
Apiaceae
Native to the UK
No
Foliage
Deciduous
Habit
Clump forming
Genus

Daucus are more commonly known as wild carrot, a group of herbaceous, biennial (although not always) plants which can reach a height of between 30 to 60cm. The triangular shaped leaves are tripinnate, divided and lacy and flowers begin in pink buds, opening into small and white clustered together in dense umbels. The fruit is small, hairy and lumpy.

Name status

Accepted

How to grow

Cultivation

Grow in an open, sunny position with deeply cultivated, well-drained soil; heavy clay or stony soils may cause carrots to fork so it is best to make sure you have removed as many stones as possible and for clay soils add plenty of organic matter, such as well rotted manure. To reduce chances of harvesting forked carrots in clay soil choose a short-rooted cultivar. Keep seeds well-watered until your seedlings have emerged. You can also sow seeds in containers, especially if you select a cultivar with a shorter root. Harvest carrots from June until October. For more advice, see carrots cultivation.

Propagation

Propagate by seed. See sowing vegetable seeds

Suggested planting locations and garden types
  • Cottage and informal garden
  • Wildlife gardens
Pruning

No pruning required

Pests

Roots may be susceptible to carrot fly larvae, wireworm, slugs and rodents; foliage may be susceptible to aphids. A barrier of fine insect mesh at least 60cm high around the beds can help prevent carrot fly laying eggs.

Diseases

Generally disease-free although may be susceptible to carrot leaf blight in wet conditions during the growing season.

Get involved

The Royal Horticultural Society is the UK’s leading gardening charity. We aim to enrich everyone’s life through plants, and make the UK a greener and more beautiful place.