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BeddingHerbaceous Perennial

Dahlia 'Amy Cave' (Ba)

dahlia 'Amy Cave'

A tuberous rooted perennial that grows to 1.1m in height, with Ball form deep crimson red-purple flowers, 10-15cm in width, held above the divided green foliage

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Size
Ultimate height
1–1.5 metres
Time to ultimate height
1–2 years
Ultimate spread
0.1–0.5 metres
Growing conditions
Clay
Loam
Sand
Moisture
Moist but well–drained
pH
Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Colour & scent
StemFlowerFoliageFruit
Spring Green
Summer Red Purple Green
Autumn Red Purple Green
Winter
Position
  • Full sun
Aspect

East–facing or South–facing or West–facing

Exposure
Sheltered
Hardiness
H3
Botanical details
Family
Asteraceae
Native to the UK
No
Foliage
Deciduous
Habit
Clump forming
Genus

Dahlia are tuberous rooted perennials with pinnately divided leaves and showy flowerheads, double in many cultivars, in summer and autumn

Name status

Accepted

Horticultural Group
Ball dahlias have rounded, fully double flowerheads with partly incurved florets

How to grow

Cultivation

Grow in fertile, humus-rich, well-drained soil, enriched with organic matter and general purpose fertiliser, in full sun. Pinch out growing tips to encourage bushy plants and stake. Water freely in dry periods. Lift and store tubers in autumn to replant or use as a source of cuttings in spring

Propagation

Propagate by softwood cuttings taken in spring from shoots from stored tubers, or divide the tubers ensuring each division has a viable bud

Suggested planting locations and garden types
  • Cottage and informal garden
  • Patio and container plants
  • City and courtyard gardens
  • Cut flowers
  • Flower borders and beds
  • Bedding
Pruning

Deadhead to prolong flowering. Cut back to near ground level in the autumn, before lifting and storing for the winter

Pests

Aphids, leaf miners, glasshouse red spider mite and slugs are common pests. Earwigs sometimes damage blooms. Capsid bug and caterpillars are occasional pests

Diseases

Powdery mildews can be damaging in dry conditions. In wet weather grey moulds and other fungal rots can be a problem. Fungal rots can also damage stored tubers. A virus may cause stunting, leaf markings and distortion

Get involved

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