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Fruit EdibleShrubs

Ribes uva-crispa 'Captivator' (C)
  • RHS Plants for pollinators

gooseberry 'Captivator'

A deep red gooseberry suitable for culinary and edible use, fairly disease resistant and almost thornless, just a few on new growth. A deciduous shrub with a spreading bushy habit and mid-green lobed leaves. White flowers appear March to April and steady picking of the fruit begins in July. Self-fertile

Synonyms
Ribes uva-crispa var. reclinatum 'Captivator'

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Size
Ultimate height
2.5–4 metres
Time to ultimate height
2–5 years
Ultimate spread
1.5–2.5 metres
Growing conditions
Chalk
Loam
Sand
Moisture
Moist but well–drained
pH
Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Colour & scent
StemFlowerFoliageFruit
Spring White Green
Summer Green Red
Autumn Red
Winter
Position
  • Full shade
  • Partial shade
Aspect

East–facing or North–facing or South–facing or West–facing

Exposure
Sheltered
Hardiness
H6
Botanical details
Family
Grossulariaceae
Native to the UK
No
Foliage
Deciduous
Habit
Bushy
Genus

Ribes can be deciduous or evergreen shrubs, sometimes spiny, with simple, usually palmately lobed leaves and small tubular or bell-shaped, solitary or racemose flowers borne in spring or summer, followed by juicy, sometimes edible berries

Name status

Accepted

How to grow

Cultivation

Grow gooseberries in a moist but well-drained soil that has been improves with organic matter. Mildly alkaline (chalky) soils are tolerated. They can be grown as goblet-shaped bushes or cordons. Water well as fruits swell and keep the base of the plants weed and grass-free. See gooseberry cultivation for more growing advice

Propagation

Propagate by hardwood cuttings

Suggested planting locations and garden types
  • Cottage and informal garden
  • Edible fruit
Pruning

Prune gooseberries in winter and summer

Pests

May be susceptible to gooseberry sawfly, capsid bug, birds, squirrels and aphids can be problematic

Diseases

May be susceptible to American gooseberry mildew and gooseberry leaf spot can cause problems

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