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Annual Biennial

Pisum sativum 'Terrain'PBR
  • RHS AGM

A climbing annual, with rather bluish-green foliage with rounded leaflets, often marbled with grey-silver, each leaf ending in a clinging tendril to help the plant climb. White flowers in spring and summer are followed by green pods. This shelling variety produces a heavy crop of sweet peas

Size
Ultimate height
0.5–1 metres
Time to ultimate height
1 year
Ultimate spread
0.1–0.5 metres
Growing conditions
Chalk
Clay
Loam
Sand
Moisture
Moist but well–drained
pH
Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Colour & scent
StemFlowerFoliageFruit
Spring White Green Grey Silver
Summer White Green Grey Silver Green
Autumn Green Grey Silver Green
Winter
Position
  • Full sun
Aspect

South–facing or West–facing

Exposure
Sheltered
Hardiness
H2
Botanical details
Family
Fabaceae
Native to the UK
No
Foliage
Deciduous
Habit
Climbing
Genus

A very small genus of annual, flowering plants from legume family. Native to SW Asia and NE Africa, species P. sativum is widely cultivated for food. Hollow. Climbing or trailing stems bear compound leaves and tendrils. Flowers are butterfly-shaped, 1-3 per stalk. The fruit is a pod

Name status

Accepted

How to grow

Cultivation

Sow seed once the soil is warm in early spring to early summer, in a double row at about 7cm spacings in a flat-bottomed drill 5cm deep and 15cm wide. Choose a position in full sun, with well-drained but humus-rich, moisture-retentive, preferably near-neutral, soil and support with twiggy sticks or netting. Pick pods regularly to ensure a continuous crop; for more advice see Peas (Grow your own)

Propagation

Propagate by seed. See sowing vegetable seeds

Suggested planting locations and garden types
Pruning

No pruning required

Pests

May be susceptible to pea moth, aphids, pea and bean weevil, pea thrips, pigeons, slugs and snails; mice may eat newly sown seeds

Diseases

May be susceptible to foot and root rot, Fusarium wilt, grey moulds, pea leaf and pod spot, and virus diseases. This variety is relatively resistant to powdery mildews and downy mildew

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