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Prunus persica 'Amber' (F)
  • RHS Plants for pollinators

peach 'Amber'

A naturally dwarf, self-fertile peach cultivar with attractive long slender green leaves to 15cm long, and pink spring blossom followed by large, golden-orange fruit flushed red, with sweet yellow flesh. Ideal for container cultivation. Cropping season: late July

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Size
Ultimate height
1–1.5 metres
Time to ultimate height
5–10 years
Ultimate spread
1–1.5 metres
Growing conditions
Chalk
Loam
Sand
Moisture
Moist but well–drained, Well–drained
pH
Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Colour & scent
StemFlowerFoliageFruit
Spring Pink Green
Summer Green Gold Orange Yellow
Autumn Gold
Winter
Position
  • Full sun
Aspect

South–facing or West–facing

Exposure
Sheltered
Hardiness
H4
Botanical details
Family
Rosaceae
Native to the UK
No
Foliage
Deciduous
Habit
Bushy, Spreading branched
Genus

Prunus can be deciduous or evergreen trees or shrubs with showy flowers in spring, and often good autumn foliage colour. Some have edible fruit in autumn, and a few species have ornamental bark

Name status

Unresolved

How to grow

Cultivation

Ideal for growing in containers. Preferably overwinter container grown plants in a protected environment such as cold greenhouse. Outdoors plant in very sheltered spot and moist, but well-drained soil in full sun. Protect flowers from frosts with horticultural fleece. See peach cultivation or how to grow: peaches for further advice

Propagation

Peach cultivars are propagated by grafting onto a rootstock for fruit. Can also be propagated by seed, although the resulting fruit is likely to be inferior to that of the parent plant

Suggested planting locations and garden types
  • City and courtyard gardens
  • Cottage and informal garden
  • Patio and container plants
  • Wildlife gardens
  • Edible fruit
  • Wall side borders
Pruning

Pruning group 1. Dwarf cultivars need litlle or no pruning. Prune in mid-summer if silver leaf is a problem

Pests

May be susceptible to glasshouse red spider mite, aphids, and scale may be problematic, especially on wall-trained specimens or those grown in a glasshouse. Squirrels and birds may damage fruit

Diseases

May be susceptible to peach leaf curl, bacterial canker, silver leaf, brown rot, blossom wilt and honey fungus. Replant diseases may cause problems. Late frosts can damage the blossom

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