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Hydrangea quercifolia 'Snow Queen'
  • RHS AGM

oak-leaved hydrangea [Snow Queen]

A deciduous, mound-forming shrub with large, deeply-lobed, mid green leaves turning a bronze-purple in autumn. Profuse, dense, conical, upright flower panicles produced from summer to autumn are composed of large white ray florets, becoming pink as the flowers age in autumn

Synonyms
Hydrangea quercifolia 'Flemygea'
Hydrangea quercifolia 'Snow Queen'
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Size
Ultimate height
1.5–2.5 metres
Time to ultimate height
5–10 years
Ultimate spread
1.5–2.5 metres
Growing conditions
Clay
Loam
Moisture
Moist but well–drained
pH
Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Colour & scent
StemFlowerFoliageFruit
Spring Green
Summer White Green
Autumn Pink Bronze Purple
Winter
Position
  • Full sun
  • Partial shade
Aspect

South–facing or North–facing or West–facing or East–facing

Exposure
Sheltered
Hardiness
H5
Botanical details
Family
Hydrangeaceae
Native to the UK
No
Foliage
Deciduous
Habit
Bushy
Potentially harmful
Skin allergen. Wear gloves and other protective equipment when handling. Pets (dogs, cats): Harmful if eaten. For further information and contact numbers regarding pets, see the HTA guide to potentially harmful plants
Genus

Hydrangea can be deciduous or evergreen shrubs, or self-clinging climbers, with flowers in clusters usually comprising both small fertile and more showy sterile flowers; often good autumn colour

Name status

Trade

How to grow

Cultivation

Grow in any moist but well-drained soil in partial shade or grow in sun if soil remains reliably moist. Improve chalky soils with organic matter to support good growth. See shrubby hydrangea cultivation for further advice

Propagation

Propagate by softwood cuttings in early summer and hardwood cuttings in winter

Suggested planting locations and garden types
  • City and courtyard gardens
  • Cottage and informal garden
  • Coastal
  • Flower borders and beds
Pruning

Pruning group 1

Pests

May be susceptible to aphids, capsid bug, hydrangea scale and vine weevil

Diseases

May be susceptible to a leaf spot, powdery mildews, grey moulds (Botrytis) and honey fungus (rarely)

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