© Shutterstock

Introducing...

Haworthia

Botanical name: Haworthia

Common name: Haworthia

Compact and easy to look after, these popular houseplants form attractive rosettes of succulent leaves. They’re available in many different forms, often striped or speckled, making them highly collectable. They mostly originate from dry regions of South Africa and neighbouring countries.

Looks

Haworthias usually grow as small rosettes of succulent leaves, which are often boldly striped or spotted with white. They can be solitary plants or form clumps, depending on the species. Some, such as Haworthia cooperi, have translucent leaf tips, which evolved to let them photosynthesise even when partially covered by sand in their native habitat. 

Likes

Position in bright, indirect light and water sparingly, only when the compost is approaching dryness. Haworthias grow best at 10–26°C (50–80°F). During winter they need a dormant period, with cool conditions and only occasional, light watering – just enough to prevent leaf loss or shrivelling. The potting compost should be free-draining and sandy.

Dislikes

Haworthias tend to rot if watered too much or left sitting in damp compost, especially in winter when they need a dormant period with cooler, drier conditions. If not allowed a winter rest, they’ll form thin, weak growth that will spoil the shape of the plant. Fluoride in tap water can cause leaf damage, so use rainwater or filtered water if possible. Always keep above 10°C (50°F).

Did you know?

Clump-forming haworthias are easy to propagate – simply separate some of the smaller rosettes around the outside and pot up individually to increase your collection or give to  friends.
 

Growing guide

Haworthias we recommend

Useful advice

Houseplants for different locations

Houseplants for different locations

How to grow epiphyllum cacti

How to grow epiphyllum cacti

How to grow hardy cacti and succulents

How to grow hardy cacti and succulents

How to grow houseplant cacti and succulents

How to grow houseplant cacti and succulents

How to grow houseplants

How to grow houseplants

How to help a poorly houseplant

How to help a poorly houseplant

Get involved

The Royal Horticultural Society is the UK’s leading gardening charity. We aim to enrich everyone’s life through plants, and make the UK a greener and more beautiful place.