Andrew Salisbury

Principal Entomologist

I have had a lifelong interest in insects, particularly beetles, and as a child kept stick insects, locusts and several species of tropical cockroach in my bedroom

The amazing world of insects captivated me before I left primary school, whilst most of my classmates played football I would collect caterpillars from the hedge surrounding the pitch. By the time I was at secondary school I kept several species of tropical cockroach in my bedroom and could regularly be found in collecting beetles almost anywhere. Before heading to university I was helping the Warwickshire recorder for dung beetles and worked as a volunteer with the entomologists at my local museum.

Naturally this led to academic study gaining a BScH in Entomology from Imperial College in 1995, the following year I graduated with an MSc in Pest Management (Applied Entomology) again from Imperial College. As part of the work for the RHS I returned to Imperial College, completing a PhD in 2008 on the Impact, Host Range and Chemical Ecology of the Lily Beetle, Lilioceris lilii.

I joined the RHS in 1998, and as part of the Plant Health team carrying out research and provide advice on a wide range of garden related animal matters to gardeners from pests, to garden wildlife and recording the biodiversity at RHS gardens. Currently research interests focus on the Plants for Bugs project (assessing the importance of native and non-native plants for invertebrates in gardens), pollinators in gardens and the distributions of non-native insects such as rosemary beetle.
 

Andrew's posts and conversations

  • Green walls - are they any good for wildlife?

    Green walls are good for our environment but their wildlife value is unknown. An RHS project is

    Read more
  • Checking out the invaders in your backyard

    Decades of RHS research charting the spread of non-native insects is now available on YouTube:

    Read more