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Quercus suber

cork oak

A slow-growing evergreen tree grown for its bark - this is the origin of cork - which develops into a craggy, fissured grey of great character. If some bark was to be harvested, it is brick red beneath until new bark forms.The leaves are dark glossy green above, pale and felty below. The acorns are long and slender, with less than a third held in a shaggy cup

Other common names
cork tree

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Size
Ultimate height
Higher than 12 metres
Time to ultimate height
20–50 years
Ultimate spread
Wider than 8 metres
Growing conditions
Loam
Sand
Moisture
Well–drained
pH
Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Colour & scent
StemFlowerFoliageFruit
Spring Green Cream
Summer Green Cream
Autumn Green Cream Brown
Winter Green Cream
Position
  • Full sun
Aspect

East–facing or North–facing or South–facing or West–facing

Exposure
Sheltered
Hardiness
H5
Botanical details
Family
Fagaceae
Native to the UK
No
Foliage
Evergreen
Habit
Spreading branched
Potentially harmful
Pets (dogs): Harmful if eaten - for further information and contact numbers regarding pets, see the HTA guide to potentially harmful plants
Genus

Quercus can be deciduous or evergreen trees or shrubs, with entire, lobed or toothed leaves; flowers inconspicuous, followed by characteristic acorns; sometimes good autumn colour

Name status

Correct

Plant range
W Mediterranean

How to grow

Cultivation

Suited to large gardens and parkland. Grow in any well-drained but moisture-retentive soil in good light. For more information see tree cultivation.

Propagation

Propagate by seed soon after it drops or by semi-ripe cuttings in late summer

Suggested planting locations and garden types
  • Architectural
Pruning

Pruning group 1

Pests

May be susceptible to oak processionary moth, aphids, caterpillars, leaf-mining moths and oak gall wasps

Diseases

May be susceptible to powdery mildews and honey fungus

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