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Herbaceous Perennial

Chrysanthemum E.H. Wilson s.n.
  • RHS Plants for pollinators

An erect, woody-based, deciduous perennial, producing stems to 90cm (3ft) high and a spread of 50cm (20in), with deeply divided, aromatic green leaves. In late summer and autumn, the plants produce sprays of semi-double, cream flowers with a yellow eye. The flowers are long lasting in water and are ideal to grow for cutting. The plants are winter hardy throughout most of the UK, but if grown in colder areas, are best heavily mulched over winter, or lifted after flowering and kept in cold, but frost-free conditions until spring. The flowers are attractive to pollinators and make good subjects to include in a wildlife garden.

Synonyms
Chrysanthemum 'Old White Variety'
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Size
Ultimate height
0.5–1 metres
Time to ultimate height
2–5 years
Ultimate spread
0.5–1 metres
Growing conditions
Loam
Sand
Clay
Moisture
Moist but well–drained, Well–drained
pH
Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Colour & scent
StemFlowerFoliageFruit
Spring Green
Summer Cream Yellow Green
Autumn Cream Yellow Green
Winter
Position
  • Full sun
Aspect

South–facing or West–facing

Exposure
Sheltered
Hardiness
H5
Botanical details
Family
Asteraceae
Native to the UK
No
Foliage
Deciduous
Habit
Bushy, Clump forming
Potentially harmful
May cause skin allergy
Genus

Chrysanthemum are erect woody-based perennials with aromatic, pinnately lobed leaves and flowerheads of diverse form, from late summer to late autumn

Name status

Unresolved

How to grow

Cultivation

Grow in a well-drained, fertile, moisture-retentive soil in full sun. In cool regions, lift the plants in autumn, before the first frosts and store the crowns in trays of just moist compost in frost-free conditions until spring. In areas where temperatures fall no lower than -5˚C (23˚F) in winter, plants may be left in the ground and protected by a thick mulch over winter, carefully removing this in spring, after the risk of frosts has passed.

Propagation

Propagate by basal softwood cuttings from overwintered stools in late winter or early spring. Cuttings should be rooted in a loamless compost the surface of which is covered with dry sand and kept in a temperature of 16°C. Place in a cold frame after first rooting and protect from frost. Harden off in mid spring. Established clumps may be propagated by division in spring.

Suggested planting locations and garden types
  • City and courtyard gardens
  • Cottage and informal garden
  • Patio and container plants
  • Wildlife gardens
  • Cut flowers
  • Flower borders and beds
Pruning

Once flowering is over in late autumn, cut the whole plant down to 20cm (8in) tall.

Pests

May be susceptible to capsid bug, earwigs, chrysanthemum eelworm, aphids, chrysanthemum leaf miner and glasshouse red spider mite

Diseases

May be susceptible to Powdery mildews, virus diseases, grey moulds and chrysanthemum white rust

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