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Fruit EdibleClimber Wall Shrub

Vitis vinifera

grape vine

V. vinifera is a woody plant, climbing by tendrils, to 15-18m. Leaves are 3- or 5-lobed, coarsely toothed, 7.5-15cm long and wide, with stalks half as long as the blade. Flowers are tiny, greenish, in loose panicles, fruit oval or globose grapes. This species has many named cultivars, selected for fruiting, or for ornamental qualities as the leaves are variable in size, shape and colour

Other common names
cultivated grape
European grape
see morewine grape

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Size
Ultimate height
Higher than 12 metres
Time to ultimate height
2–5 years
Ultimate spread
2.5–4 metres
Growing conditions
Chalk
Loam
Sand
Moisture
Well–drained
pH
Alkaline, Neutral
Colour & scent
StemFlowerFoliageFruit
Spring Green
Summer Green Green
Autumn Green Black Green
Winter
Position
  • Full sun
Aspect

South–facing or West–facing

Exposure
Sheltered
Hardiness
H5
Botanical details
Family
Vitaceae
Native to the UK
No
Foliage
Deciduous
Habit
Climbing
Potentially harmful
Contact may irritate the skin. Wear gloves and other protective equipment when handling
Genus

Vitis are vigorous deciduous climbing shrubs with tendrils and attractively lobed leaves, insignificant green flowers followed by often edible fruits; some have excellent autumn foliage colour

Name status

Correct

How to grow

Cultivation

Grow in a deep well-drained soil with a pH of, ideally between 6.5 and 7.0. Plant between late autumn and early spring. If container grown, plant in late spring when the threat of frost has passed. Vines can be trained as cordons or using the guyot system. Mulch with well-rotted farmyard manure in the first years after planting

Propagation

Propagate by hardwood cuttings or grafting onto Phylloxera resistant rootstocks

Suggested planting locations and garden types
  • Cottage and informal garden
  • Wall side borders
Pruning

Grape pruning and training is carried out in winter and midsummer. Pruning group 11 or pruning group 12 for formal training

Pests

May suffer from glasshouse red spider mite and brown scale; mealybugs are a problem under glass

Diseases

May be affected by powdery mildews and grey moulds

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